Posts Tagged brett eastman

Why Should Your Church Produce Your Own Video Curriculum?

By Allen White

Video-based small group curriculum has been with us for over a decade now. Early innovators like Rick Warren and Brett Eastman at Saddleback Church brought the local pastor into the living room. Brett went on to found Lifetogether.com, which has sold about 4 million units to date. Many other video-based studies have followed and have succeeded.

With all of the professionally produced video curriculum out there, why would a church want to create their own? While well-known pastors have produced some excellent studies, your pastor’s face on the screen presents some strong advantages for your congregation.

1.       Takes the Weekend into the Week.

The hustle and bustle of life tends to edge out the Sunday morning sermon after a day or so. While some sermons are remembered better than others, most are long forgotten by mid-week. By providing small groups with studies based on the weekend message, the points made on Sunday can take deeper root.

By creating space in the small group to review the weekend message via a short video (no more than 10 minutes), the group has a chance to review the points, ask questions, discuss issues and make a specific application to their lives. Giving groups the opportunity to think about the message and what it means to them causes the group members to retain more. In groups they can involve more of themselves in the teaching. Rather than simply listening and maybe taking notes, group members can wrestle with hard questions and get the encouragement and accountability they need to live out the message.

2.       Engages the Senior Pastor’s Teaching Gift.

A senior pastor without a teaching gift is not a senior pastor for long. This is the most public and most personal role of any senior pastor. Speaking is hard work. Even the most gifted teachers spend hours gathering material, studying, collecting illustrations, and polishing their messages. Once Sunday is finished, for most pastors, the countdown clock to next week’s sermon begins. The one they worked so hard on for this week is now a thing of the past. But, it doesn’t have to be.

What if the pastor could sit down in a living room with his church members and teach them the part he couldn’t get to on Sunday morning? What if in that circle the pastor could share his heart about what the Bible passage means and what it would mean if people started obeying it? A video-based curriculum can breathe new life into a message destined for the archives. Not only will the congregation learn more, but the message will go farther through the group.

3.       Elevates the Role of Groups.

For most churchgoers, the initial draw to a church is the pastor’s teaching and the music. As hard as the other church staff work in their roles, this is the simple truth. Other than Jesus Himself, the senior pastor plays a highly significant role in the spiritual lives of his congregation.

By connecting the small group study to the weekend message, you can leverage the influence of the senior pastor in leading his people to connect in small groups. Once the pastor has created a video curriculum, his next question will be “How do we use this? How do we recruit more leaders? How do we get people into groups?” Don’t you want your senior pastor asking those questions?

What’s important to the senior pastor will be what’s important to the congregation. Bulletins, video announcements, website – none of these come close to having the #1 influencer in the church direct the congregation. When the pastor asks for people to host groups, people will host groups. When the pastor invites members to join groups, members will join groups. When E.F. Hutton talks…

I learned this lesson about a decade ago. I had spent seven years recruiting and training leaders only to find 30 percent of our congregation in groups. But, the first time our senior pastor stood up and asked for host homes, we doubled our groups in one day. I never looked back. He did all of the recruiting and leading from that point forward.

4.       Moves the Weekend Message Beyond the Church Walls.

When church members invite their friends, neighbors, co-workers, relatives and others to join them for a church-produced Bible study, the senior pastor is introduced to many more people than actually attend the church on Sunday. In homes, workplaces, Starbucks and even commuter trains, the pastor’s teaching goes out to many new people.

Often new people will meet the pastor via video before they meet him in person. But, the transition from the living room to the church auditorium now is not quite as daunting. New folks feel they’ve already met the pastor through the weekly group studies. And, don’t tell the group hosts and leaders, but they’re actually doing evangelism. Shhh.

5.       Puts Group Multiplication on Steroids.

A DVD curriculum is easy to use. In fact, someone who has never led before simply needs to follow the instructions. The teaching on the DVD provides the wisdom and expertise. The questions in the book provide the pathway for a great discussion. Pushing play and reading questions is not so hard.

Think about this: every person in your church has friends. The people who are less involved in the church will actually have far more friends outside of the church. What if your church members each gathered a group of 8-10 people for a video-based study featuring your senior pastor? Could a church of 100 members reach 1,000 people? What about a church of 1,000 going after 10,000? What about a church of 13,000 reaching over 100,000? Is it possible? The Bible says all things are possible with God.

I’ve created quite a few DVD-based studies in both churches I’ve served at over the last 10 years. If you’d like some help creating your own curriculum, shoot me an email: allen@allenwhite.org

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Your Focus Determines Your Small Group Ministry Success

By Allen White crowd in line

When you think about connecting a congregation into community or taking a crowd and turning them into disciples, the task can be quite mindboggling. Sometimes in contemplating the enormity of the task, we expend a lot of energy on things that are either not great investments of our time or are things other people should be doing. There is only so much of any small group pastor or director. Knowing where to apply your efforts will determine your success and possibly your sanity.

I tend to learn best in the school of hard knocks. Please understand while I believe all of my efforts have been well intentioned, I have made quite a number of well intentioned mistakes along the way. The good news is I have learned or am learning from most of those failed attempts, and I am now passing these painful lessons on to you.

Every small group pastor, including myself, who considers how to connect a congregation into community, typically starts with the wrong questions, which lead to the wrong strategies, which ends up with poor results. It typically goes like this:

1. How do I connect people into groups?

This is question comes from the assumption that most people file in and out of church never talking to anybody and have no real friends outside of church. People are far more connected than you might imagine. In fact, I would go so far as to say your people are already in multiple groups. The question is: how are those groups helping them to grow spiritually? What are they doing to intentionally grow in their faith?

The reality is most people don’t have time for a small group and lack the capacity to maintain any more relationships. Now, before you quit your job, there’s a solution. Think about how people can leverage their existing connections to grow spiritually. Could you create an easy to use curriculum available for them to discuss spiritual things with their friends at dinner or their co-workers at lunch? The dilemma is not placing people into groups, but introducing a spiritual growth component to the groups they are already in.

If you feel your main task is to place people into groups via some dreaded system like a sign up card, trust me, you need to get out of that business ASAP. Yes, there are some exceptions to what I described above, but as Brett Eastman would say, “Let the exceptions be the exceptions.” If you build your entire system around the needs of exceptions, you will devote 90% of your energy to less than 5% of your people. For more ideas on how to connect people who are new to your church and who have truly no friends, click here.

2. How do I recruit group leaders?

You don’t. If your senior pastor is willing to create small group curriculum based on his teaching, then he will volunteer to recruit group leaders for you. You may be thinking, “That will never work in my church.” Let me ask you a question, “Has your senior pastor ever created his own curriculum?” Once a pastor has invested his time and energy in producing a small group curriculum, he won’t want to see that investment go to waste.

In just a few short weeks, your pastor can get half or more of your congregation into a study based on his teaching. All he has to do is ask. He will want to ask because he now has skin in the game. I’ve seen this happen in a church of 50 people, churches of tens of thousands of people, and both of the churches I have served on staff.

Small group pastors don’t need to recruit small group leaders. Your senior pastor will take care of this (and get a far better result).

3. How do I support and encourage small group leaders?

This is the right question. The real work of a small group pastor is to implement the systems and strategies to sustain groups over time (Wow, that really sounds like Brett Eastman). When I coach small group pastors in how to launch a church-wide series, the first task is to identify experienced group leaders and mature believers who will serve as a small group team for the first teaching series. Imagine if you suddenly had half or better of your congregation in groups, how would you manage the needs of those leaders?

Sure you could send a few email blasts or have your assistant call them, but the key to developing groups which will continue is a coaching structure to support them. This is a decentralized, one-on-one strategy. It’s the opposite of on-campus training meetings or robocalls. There is a place for training meetings. There is no place for robocalls. Everybody hates telemarketers…everybody. (I actually was a telemarketer for three days once. It was hard to live with myself for those 72 hours).

The hard work of small group ministry lies here. If you skip this step, then you will experience a short-lived, one-time success and then it will devolve into a number of leaders you can personally manage. Again, I’ve lived it. I’ve been there.

This is not a reason to become overwhelmed. This is a reason to pray. God knows what He wants to accomplish in your church during your upcoming launch. God also knows every person who can help you successfully start and sustain groups. If you ask God to direct you to the right small group team, pay attention to who crosses your path. God will answer your prayer. He’s certainly answered mine.

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What the Church Could Learn from the Gaylord Opryland Hotel

By Allen White GaylordOprylandMap

I just returned from the NRB Convention at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel in Nashville. The last time I was at Opryland was nearly 30 years ago, and it was an amusement park. Things have changed.

It was a great convention meeting folks like Gary Smalley, Steve Scott, Dr. David Jeremiah, and Dr. Tony Evans (Lifetogether worked on his Destiny curriculum and helped to launch 500 new groups at Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship.) While these are all great men of God with outstanding ministries, what really impressed me was the hotel staff.

The staff was friendly and nice as you would expect in the South. They were also unusually helpful. You couldn’t stand at the hotel map for long without staff members asking if they could help you.

On one particular afternoon, I was trying to meet up with Brett Eastman, my boss at Lifetogether Ministries,  and Phillip Jackson from World Outreach Church, Murfreesboro, TN. They were watching an interview with Dr. Ben Carson and Eric Metaxas. The ballroom seemed hidden somewhere.

A hotel staffer named Jim came to my aid. He said it would be easier to walk me over than to give directions. As we walked, I asked Jim what he did. I expected an answer like “Gaylord Opryland Shirpa,” but he’s the head of construction. From carpeting to roofing, he keeps the place in tip top shape. This walk was not in his job description for sure. But, if anybody knew the building, Jim was your man.

After a very long walk (Jim averages 9 miles a day himself), I arrived at the right spot. Jim had gone the extra mile or nine for me.

Even leaving the hotel yesterday, an employee walking to her car asked about my stay and talked about how much she loved working there. Their staff are their biggest fans.

Please Comment: What could the church learn from them?

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My Daniel Plan Journey

By Allen White

Back in the Spring of this year, I had the privilege of executive producing The Daniel Plan small group curriculum for Rick Warren and ImageSaddleback Church. It was an amazing production. We shot outside at the Rancho Capistrano conference center despite, literally, planes, trains (Metrolink), and automobiles (the 5). At times we ran four sets simultaneously to capture the stories of normal people and their Daniel Plan success stories. We also had celebrity chefs and fitness experts, not to mention Rick Warren, Dr. Mark Hyman, and Dr. Daniel Amen among other experts. Then, my experience changed.

Up to that point, I thought the Daniel Plan was ok. We shopped some at Whole Foods, but the thought of a steady diet of kale did not appeal to me. Blueberries are also a super food. I’ll just stick with them. But, somebody posted a picture of me doing an interview and posted it to Twitter. To my horror I realized, I was the fat man at the Daniel Plan shoot!

A few weeks later while sitting in the Knoxville airport, breaking news reported actor James Gandolfini died of a sudden heartattack. Granted, he was never the picture of health, but the reporter went on to say James was 51 years old and had a one year old child. Larry King went on about how much the actor loved to eat. I thought, “I’m almost 49 and my wife is pregnant with our fourth child. I don’t want to be that guy.”

I came home and posted two pictures on my desk: the fat guy interviewing at the Daniel Plan shoot and James Gandolfini, then I opened up The Daniel Plan to see what I really needed to do. Over the next 13 weeks, I lost 25 pounds by doing this:

1. Starting my day with a quiet time with God.

Most of my eating, especially at night, was emotional. By starting my day with God, I gained a much needed perspective on my day as well as accessing God’s ability to accomplish what needed to be done that day. With my mind and heart steady, I could navigate my day with God’s help and without hitting the fridge at the end of the day.

2. Eating Well.

We cleared out our pantry. No high fructose corn syrup, no MSG, and no trans-fats from that point forward. I learned how to shop and read labels. Yes, the grocery bill went up buying organic and grass fed and free range, but my energy also went way up. We had a new baby, and I didn’t skip a beat, even with interrupted sleep every night.

3. Exercising…less.

I used to go to the gym every day — cardio, weights, the whole bit. Now, I walked around my neighborhood for 30 minutes three times per week. And, that’s all. No hot yoga. No deep knee bends. Just a walk and usually a talk with God while I’m doing it.

4. I looked at James Gandolfini and the fat guy at the Daniel Plan shoot every day.

This kept my focus on what was important and why I was doing what I was doing. I never imagined Tony Soprano would have such a profound impact on my life, unless I got on the wrong side of him, I suppose.

5. Family support.

My wife and I have done this journey together with our family. Plus I’ve done a lot of the cooking, which she’s been grateful for.

There is much more to tell than what I have time for here. But, I am pleased to report that I am eating more steak (grass fed) and chocolate (73% cacoa) than I ever have of the other variety. There are no weigh ins and no condemnation. But, I’ve experienced plenty of success, which is an incredible motivator.

Check out the Daniel Plan for yourself.

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Avoiding the Pitfalls of a Church-wide Campaign

By Allen White

Church-wide campaigns are a powerful vehicle for connecting congregations into community and impacting spiritual growth. 40 Days of Purpose from Rick Warren, One Month to Live by Kerry Shook, and a number of other church-wide experiences prove the catalytic impact of a small group study aligned with a sermon series. Churches and their members will never be the same.

One size never fits all, especially in a church-wide campaign. When you invite all of your groups to do the same study that aligns to the weekend service, you might have just set yourself up for trouble. Your groups are made up of new Christians and non-Christians, “mature” Christians and critical ones. How do you meet the needs of all of your different groups with one curriculum?

Over-Promising + Under-Delivering = Great Frustration

1.       State Up Front What the Curriculum Is and What It Isn’t

Managing expectations is key to focusing your groups on the right track. If your curriculum is designed for the broadest appeal, you will soon be hearing from your “mature” folks that the study is “light weight.” For the critics I know well, my  usually is “I can see how you could think that if you were only talking about the material….”

Recently in helping a church full of nuclear engineers and rocket scientists develop a curriculum on the One Anothers of Scripture, we concluded that if the group members simple memorized all of the One Anothers, then we had failed. Practicing the One Anothers was the key, and it isn’t rocket science.

Let your groups know up front how the curriculum is designed and why. “We have created this curriculum for any person to use in doing this study with their friends.” It’s not that you avoided creating a “deeper” study – boy, that’s a loaded word – but, you have intentionally designed or chosen a study to include as many people as possible. After six weeks, they can choose something that’s maybe more to their liking.

2.       Mayday, Mayday — If a Study Does Work, Throw It Out.

The worst thing that can happen to a group is to feel obligated to complete a study because they spent $10 on the book. Some studies just don’t work in every group. It’s better to lose the study rather than to lose your group.

Problems with ill-fitting studies can range from outright complacency to lack of participation to high absenteeism. This is not the time to just tough it out or put your head in the sand. State the obvious: “Is it just me or is this study not going very well?” Then, get feedback from the group. If the feeling is mutual, then it’s time to move on. If your members didn’t use the books (and they didn’t), there’s always Ebay.

The problem may not be the whole study, but just part of the study. A few years back, a group of 20-somethings were participating in a church-wide study. They were enjoying the study guide, but felt the DVD-teaching wasn’t scratching them where they itched. I recommend that they do the study without the DVD. Their response, “Oh, we’re way ahead of you on that one, Pastor Allen.” Some groups will never do a study without a DVD. Others will never do a study with one. And, that’s okay.

The bottom line is to do what makes sense for each group. Even if other groups raved about the study, it has to fit each group in order to work.

3.       Design Your Curriculum to Meet a Variety of Needs

In designing your own curriculum, you can meet a variety of needs with one study. As my friend, Brett Eastman at Lifetogether.com says, “You need to double clutch the study.” At the beginning of the study offer two different ice breaker questions. For new groups and new believers, maybe the question is light-hearted and offers a way for folks to get to know each other. This is something that everyone will feel comfortable talking about. “Who is your favorite super hero and why?” “What was the source of warmth in your home?” “If you were a tree, what kind of tree would you be?” (That last one’s a joke.) For more mature believers, the question should go something like, “How did you apply what you learned in last week’s study?” Deeper involves doing.

For the rest of the study, you can offer a variety of questions at different levels. For newer folks, you want to start with questions that are easy to answer right out of Scripture. For more mature members, it’s good to include a “Going Deeper” section that offers more personal questions as well as Scripture cross-references to the core text. The aim in the “Going Deeper” section is to meet a need for knowledge along with a greater need for application.

The point here is to create different questions for different types of people, then articulate the study design to the group members. Some groups will use the first half of the study only. Other groups will skip the first section and dive into the deeper questions. Giving group members the full picture of the design will help them to understand and appreciate what you have developed.

You can’t please everybody all of the time. But, by taking the time to develop your own study with different group members in mind, you go a long way in meeting a variety of needs. Hearing and addressing their expectations up front will go a long way in leading a unified campaign.

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