[Best of allenwhite.org] #2 What If I Don’t Know the Answers?

[Best of allenwhite.org] #2 What If I Don’t Know the Answers?

By Allen White

For a new small group leader, this question ranks right up there with public speaking and an IRS audit. No one likes to get caught off guard. Fear kicks in. What if the leader loses credibility? What if the group doesn’t trust the leader? What if they don’t come back? Here’s some help in navigating Bible Jeopardy in your group:

1.       Group Leaders are Facilitators, not Bible Teachers.

If this was a class and you were the teacher, then you should have all of the answers. Shame on you. Not really. Group life is not a top down exercise. Group members are the branches, but you are not the vine (John 15). Group leaders are not the hub in the center of the wagon wheel. Your Bible knowledge or lack thereof should not jeopardize the group.

Group life is more like a web of relationships. As group leader, you took the initiative to gather the group. You are responsible for the group, but it’s not your responsibility to do everything for the group. As a facilitator, rather than a teacher, your job is to get the discussion started and keep it going. You are not the Bible expert. If your group is using a teaching DVD, the expert is on the video clip. Your role is to ask the questions and help your group get this teaching to where the rubber meets the road.

2.       All of Us Are Smarter Than Any One of Us.

As leader, you are not the sole person responsible for the spiritual welfare of the group. The group is responsible for each other. While that includes you, care is not limited to you.

When someone asks a question you’re not prepared to answer, throw this one out there: “What do the rest of you think?” Now, you’ve bought a little time. Let the group talk. In the process, you might send up a quick prayer, and who knows, you might end up with a solid answer. If all else fails, google something on your smartphone.

3.       When In Doubt, Here’s the Best Answer.

The best answer is simply “I don’t know.” You gain credibility when you’re honest, but you definitely will lose it if you try to fake it. No one has all of the answers, but I wouldn’t mention that to your in-laws. Every pastor and Bible teacher gets stumped once in a while. Just confess that you don’t know, do a little research, and talk about it again at the next meeting.

4.       Google It with Caution.

You can even go one better than researching the answer yourself. Ask the person with the question to research it and get back to the group. But, a word of caution – not everything on the internet is true. Unconvinced? Then, where’s the $40 million promised by that Nigerian man?

There are many reputable websites that can help:

Christian Research Institute: equip.org

John Piper: desiringgod.org

Apologetics.com

Print Resources that have helped me over the years:

When Skeptics Ask: A Handbook on Christian Evidence By Norman L. Geisler

Hard Sayings of the Bible By Walter C. Kaiser Jr.

The Case for Christ: A Journalist’s Personal Investigation of the Evidence for Jesus By Lee Strobel

[Best of allenwhite.org] #3 Are You Discipling Your Online Followers?

[Best of allenwhite.org] #3 Are You Discipling Your Online Followers?

By Allen White

With just a couple of sentences, Jesus passed the baton to His disciples. Ready or not, Jesus’ mission on earth now belonged to them and us. Before you start feeling guilty about not witnessing to your neighbor or coworker, let’s look at two promises that Jesus gave with the Great Commission.

Then the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had told them to go. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” Matthew 28:16-20

First, Jesus says, “All authority (or power) in heaven and on earth has been given to me.” We know from theology that God is omnipotent or all-powerful. The disciples aren’t to run their mission by their wits, but with Jesus’ authority. They (and we) really have nothing to fear. Authority over everything and everyone belongs to the One who sends us.

Next, Jesus says, “And surely I am with you always.” Jesus didn’t just send His disciples, He promised to be them. In the going and disciple-making and baptizing and teaching, Jesus was (and is) with His disciples.

The mission is to make disciples. What is disciple? A disciple is simply a follower. If you are on Facebook, Twitter, MySpace (is anyone on there anymore?), LinkedIn or any other social network, you have followers. Essentially, you have disciples. You have influence.

My only complaint with social media is that I encounter every person I’ve ever known on a daily basis: childhood friends in Kansas, college friends from Missouri, church friends from California, ministry colleagues from across the US, and friends in South Carolina. In the words of George Costanza, “Worlds are colliding.”

So, here’s the question: where are you leading your followers?

In 1994, I signed up for CompuServe. I was known as 43925.32924@compuserve.net back then. I spent a good deal of time in a Christian forum (chat room) because it was Christian and had a low flat rate. I met a number of people online who became friends, including a guy named Greg, who wasn’t a Christian, but did enjoy the low flat rate.

Greg was sort of like a teetotaler who wondered into a bar and didn’t know what to drink. We had some great conversations about life and faith and ridiculous things. One day, Greg posted a message, “Jesus died for my sins.” Most of us wondered what the punch line was going to be. But, there in community with believers, Greg crossed the line of faith.

Not too long after that our group of virtual friends came together face to face. I had the privilege of baptizing Greg in his Jacuzzi. (It was California, after all).

Rather than chatting up old flames and deceiving ourselves into thinking that relationship would somehow be more fulfilling than the relationship that we’re in, why not pray about how your followers might one day become Jesus’ followers too? I’m not encouraging you to be obnoxious. The world has enough annoying Christians. But, with Jesus’ power and presence, your influence is significant. How can you help your followers become Jesus’ followers too?

What If I’m Not a Good Example to My Group?

What If I’m Not a Good Example to My Group?

By Allen White

When it comes to measuring up, most small group leaders fall short. That’s the simple truth. You’re not the only leader who fought with your spouse right before the doorbell rang and your first group member arrived. You’re not the only group leader who’s lost your temper, then felt the need to paste on a smile. What do you do when you feel like you don’t measure up to God’s standard? Should you stop leading? If that’s the case, we’d all stop leading.

In the Bible, David asks, “LORD, who may dwell in your sacred tent? Who may live on your holy mountain? The one whose walk is blameless, who does what is righteous, who speaks the truth from their heart” Psalm 15:1-2

While we should all strive to become more like Christ, if perfection is the qualification, then that sounds like a pretty empty tent to me. I hope Jesus enjoys His solo camping trip.

Every person on the face of the earth has fallen short (Romans 3:23). No exceptions. There are no perfect people. Now, this isn’t an excuse for bad behavior. It’s just the simple truth that even at our best, we just don’t measure up. Fortunately, there is also good news.

If the requirements are to be blameless, righteous and truthful, we all fail to meet those requirements. But, Jesus is blameless (Hebrews 4:15), righteous (Romans 5:17), and the Truth (John 14:6). Some would say the solution is to act more like Jesus. WWJD? (What Would Jesus Do?) Only problem is, we can’t live up to that either.

Jesus always did the right thing. Jesus always had the right thing to say. He always had the right response to the Pharisees’ tricky questions. No one tied Jesus up in knots intellectually. No one got His goat emotionally. Nothing broke His connection with God spiritually. Imitating Jesus is not the answer. We’re just not that good.

What if we stopped trying to live for Christ and allowed Jesus to live His Life through us? Jesus said, “I am the vine; you are the branches. If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing” (John 15:5). Jesus doesn’t desire for us to try to become like Him with our own efforts. Jesus just wants us to get out of His way, so He can do His work.

Our job is not to work hard on being blameless and righteous. Our job is to remain connected to the Vine. Sometimes we’re so busy with the appearance of the fruit, we forget the connection to the Root. Decorating ourselves with artificial fruit might fool some of the people, but we’re really only fooling ourselves.

Disconnection from Christ doesn’t produce fruit. It produces death and uselessness (John 15:6).

How do we remain connected with Christ? First, we keep ourselves in constant conversation with Jesus. Not out loud in public places like some kind of a freak. But, to ourselves. Rather than mulling things over and over in our heads – replaying old tapes that keep us defeated – we need to talk to Jesus about it. “I don’t feel too good about this meeting coming up. What should I do? How should I handle this? Please guide me and help me.” And, guess what? He does.

When we read the Bible, it’s not for the purpose of discovering more things that we’re required to live up to but can’t. The Bible reveals God’s vision for our lives. When we read things that might seem impossible to do, we take those to Jesus: “Jesus, if you want me to be kind and compassionate like you said in Ephesians 4:32, you’re going to have to do that in me, because I’m not going to get there on my own.” As we surrender ourselves and give our natural responses to situations over to Jesus, He will guide our words, our actions and our steps.

Here’s the best part – the blamelessness, righteousness and truthfulness required to dwell with God is exactly what Jesus gives us. We aren’t blameless. We don’t become righteous on our own. We walk in the Truth by allowing the Truth, Jesus Christ, to live in us.

What part of your life doesn’t look like Jesus? Before you start beating yourself up, ask Him to create Christlikeness in you. You just might be surprised at how Jesus can change you for good.

Doing ministry without the power of Christ is like trying to fly without an airplane. You and I lack the ability. Doing God’s work in God’s way with God’s power will reap God’s result. You are not alone.

As the Leader, How Much Should I Share about My Own Struggles?

As the Leader, How Much Should I Share about My Own Struggles?

By Allen White

Every believer sins. No one is perfect. Whether you’re struggling with temptation or just out rightly sinning, how much do you share with your group? After all, while confession is good for the soul, it is bad for the reputation. Here are some suggestions in navigating this tricky issue:

Being Holy, Being Human

Until you signed on as a small group leader, you were just Joe (or Jane) Christian, sitting in the congregation, dealing or not dealing with your stuff, but then you became a leader. All of a sudden the struggles you felt you could share with your friends, no longer seem appropriate in your group. After all, if as the leader, you continue to fail, won’t that only give the group license to fail?

Where do we come up with these thoughts? As Christians we often specialize in ranking sins. While transgressions registered on a radar gun may be permissible, sins registered on a breathalyzer are certainly not. There are different ramifications for different transgressions. You cheated on a test in college. That was a long time ago, you were young and stupid. You cheated on your taxes. Okay, not good. The IRS would be interested. Is there a bounty for tax evaders? You cheated on your spouse. That’s a huge one. It’s all cheating, but very different levels.

What you share and how you share it will determine whether your group creates a climate of openness or a façade of pretending.  But, how do you know the right timing to open up to your group?

Check In with Your Coach

If you’re not sure what to share in your group or at what level of detail, check in with your coach. If you’re right in the middle of something, your coach can point you to the right resources. “But, what if my coach judges me or takes my group away?” First of all, no believer has any right to judge any other believer. If your coach is judging you, well, that’s on them.

As far as leadership goes, it really depends on what’s currently going on in your life. If it’s a past sin, then it’s in the past. Let God use your experience to help another. If it’s a current struggle, then you might need to step out of leadership to focus on the issue for a time.

How Much Victory Have You Achieved?

Where are you in regard to your struggle? Is it behind you? Is it in front of you? Are you in the middle of it? It’s one thing to talk about a struggle you’ve overcome to inspire or challenge others. Everyone needs God’s grace to make it one day at a time.

But, if you’re currently struggling with a life-controlling problem or a serious relationship issue, it’s time to step out of leadership and address the issue directly. While no leader is perfect, some situations are serious enough to fully deal with now before things get worse. When you’ve achieved a measure of victory, then it’s time to focus on serving others again.

Why would a leader have to step down? When you’re in leadership, you’re on the enemy’s hit list. When the pressure’s on, he will use your struggle to destroy you, your family and your group. It’s important to resolve this foothold in order to avoid a multiplication of consequences in your life, your family’s and your group’s.

When you’re leading others, you tend to focus on their needs rather than your own. Good ministry can actually help you avoid dealing with the situation in your life. Sometimes folks are even deceived into thinking that because God is using you, your habit must not matter. Oh, it matters. The enemy is just waiting for the other shoe to drop.

You’re Only as Sick as Your Secrets

The power of sin is secrecy. Once you share what’s going on with you, you expose your secret to the light of Truth. The hold on you is no longer as great. The help you need is now within arm’s reach. The Bible says, “Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed” (James 5:16). Often believers wish to declare, “This is between me and God.” Well, how’s that working? If you could have quit on your own, you would have quit by now.

As Rick Warren says, “Revealing the feeling is the beginning of healing.” A conversation with your coach or your group is the place to start on your journey to healing and wholeness.

Every believer struggles with something. Don’t beat yourself up over struggling. It just means that the Holy Spirit is working within you. If God’s Spirit wasn’t in your life, you probably wouldn’t be struggling at all. Allow God’s Spirit and God’s people to encourage and support your road to recovery.

Help Me Name My New Book

Help Me Name My New Book

Thanks for taking a few minutes to help me decide on the title and subtitle for my book. Over the years, I have collected questions from small group leaders and posted answers for them. This book is made up of answers to the Top 50 most asked  questions by small group leaders. The questions range from “When Do We Refer a Member to Counseling?” to “How Do We Handle Childcare?”

Please vote on your favorite title and subtitle for my book. If you don’t find a favorite, please suggest one!

God bless,

Allen White

How Can I Encourage My Group Members to Open Up?

How Can I Encourage My Group Members to Open Up?

By Allen White

Most leaders realize group life extends beyond well prepared and executed group meetings. While Bible study is an important aspect of a group, if everyone leaves thinking, “Boy, that was good. See you next week” without sharing what’s going on in their lives, something is definitely missing. Here’s how to help your group open up:

1.       Set the Right Expectations.

When your group members joined the group, what were they expecting? Were they looking for a 60 minute inductive Bible study followed by brownies and coffee as thanks for surviving it? Were they looking for a free-flowing discussion of everything that popped into their heads? Did they know what to expect?

Managing expectations is crucial for a successful group. Rather than dictate what the group will be or won’t be, it’s best to start by discussing what kind of group the members actually want. A simple exercise like having everyone write their top three group expectations on a card, then tabulating the results will go a long way in getting buy-in from the group.

If the group skews toward Bible study, then gradually implement some aspects of care. Start with something simple like asking for prayer requests and closing the meeting with prayer. As the group continues to meet, begin to focus more on application questions rather than Bible exploration questions. Don’t get me wrong. The discussion should be based on God’s Word. But, you want to aim for where the rubber meets the road, not where the rubber meets the air.

2.       Set the Example.

“Speed of the leader, speed of the team” is a common axiom from Bill Hybels, founding pastor of Willow Creek Community Church. The leader sets the pace. If you are open with your life, then others will be open with theirs. If you hold back, so will they.

A couple of years ago someone gave me an older car. It’s not perfect, but it’s transportation and a gift at that. One night I became frustrated with the dashboard lights. About a third of the lights wouldn’t work. Out of my arsenal of mechanical expertise, I pounded my fist of the dash. The change was both immediate and dramatic – I now had no dashboard lights.

Driving in the summer or during the day wasn’t a problem. But, anytime I had to drive early in the morning or at night, I had absolutely no idea how fast I was driving. I was embarrassed by my “repair.” While I confessed the problem to my wife, I never mentioned it to anyone else.

But, one day a circle of folks in the office were discussing their cars’ various ailments. I chose that moment in the safe circle of used car owners to confess my dashboard issue. A woman turned to me and said, “My husband has the same problem with his car. He uses his GPS to check his speed.” What a brilliant idea. I had a GPS. I no longer needed to fly blind at night.

I had dreaded the conversation with the first officer who ever pulled me over. “Sir, do you know how fast you were going?”

“No, officer. My dashboard lights aren’t working.” Somehow I imagined only a scenario with multiple traffic tickets involved. Now, I had the knowledge to detect my own speed and avoid a traffic violation.

I never would have learned that workaround if I had never admitted my problem. As Rick Warren says, “Revealing the feeling is the beginning of healing.” And, it has to start with the leader.

I shared this story when I spoke at a church a few months back. The next week, the Executive Pastor called to say that my message already was making an impact. A man confessed to his men’s group that his marriage was on the brink of divorce. He and his wife were separated, and he didn’t know what to do. Rather than judge this guy for his situation, his group members rallied around him to support him and his wife through their struggle. My illustration of automotive failure helped him open up about his marital failure.

Group leaders are no better than the group members they lead. You must be careful the leader title doesn’t block the way for your own vulnerability. If you’re group isn’t opening up, you need to check your own transparency in the group. Your honesty will encourage theirs.

3.       Set the Meeting Agenda.

To balance the need for open sharing in the group and the need to meet group expectations, the group agreement is the ideal place to start. If you’ve never created a group agreement, you should soon (Read more here).

The ground rules for your group could include an option where the group can help a member process a life situation. Some issues involve more than a casual mention during prayer request time at the end. If a group member has faced a devastating turn of events like a job loss, marital blow up, issues with children or other bad news, the group should allow space to even put the Bible study aside and support their friend in need.

But, you don’t want your group to turn into the “crisis of the week.” While every group should offer support, there is a difference between a small group built on relationships formed around a Bible study and a true support group. If a group member needs dedicated support for marital problems, grief or a life controlling issue, then a specific support group may offer better help (Read more here).

There is no perfect way to organize every small group meeting. Your group can’t offer only Bible study at the expense of care. But, your group also can’t avoid Bible study and only focus on care. As Andy Stanley says, “This is a tension to be managed rather than a problem to be solved.”

If during the discussion, you notice a group member getting teary or tender, stop and ask if they want to talk about it. They might or might not. The last impression you want to leave is that the meeting agenda is more important than the group members in the meeting.

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